X

Dear ProCon.org readers: This non-partisan non-profit oasis of truth on the Internet simply cannot exist without your support. Your donations keep the research flowing, the servers on, and millions of minds fed. Would you consider making a one-time (or monthly) tax-deductible donation to ProCon.org of at least $10? Thank you.
Dear ProCon.org readers: You know the world needs reliable, unbiased information on important issues – now more than ever. That's why you love ProCon.org, a nonprofit educational organization that provides – for free and without ads – nonpartisan facts, well-researched pros and cons, and a platform for critical thinking on today’s hottest topics to millions of students, teachers, and others. Please support ProCon.org with your tax-deductible donation in our fund drive.

If everyone who used ProCon.org donated $1, the charity would be around for decades. Millions visit but few give. This oasis of truth on the Internet simply cannot exist without your support.Your donations keep the research flowing, the servers on, and millions of minds fed. Would you consider donating at least $10 a year or becoming a recurring monthly donor? Thank you for supporting ProCon.org.
SUPPORT PROCON.ORGX



Opinion Polls/Surveys
Apr. 3, 2001 - July 22, 2002


The following polls are presented to offer readers an understanding of American opinions on felon voting. We were unable to find additional polls on this issue. If you know of any others, please let us know.

1. Harris Interactive Poll, July 18-22, 2002 2. Schroth and Associates Poll, Apr. 3-8, 2001

1. Harris Interactive Poll, July 18-22, 2002
  • N = various, MoE+/- = not stated
  • Conducted July 18-22, 2002
  • Analyzed and reported on by Jeff Manza, PhD, et. al. in "Public Attitudes Towards Felon Disenfranchisement in the US," Public Opinion Quarterly, Summer 2004
Section I

A. Question - Probation 1: "There has been some discussion recently about the right to vote in this country. Some feel that people convicted of a crime who are sentenced to probation and are living in the community should have the right to vote. Others feel that they should not have the right to vote. What about you? Do you think people on probation should have the right to vote? or haven't you thought much about this?"

Yes = 68%
B. Question - Probation 2: "There has been some discussion recently about the right to vote in this country. Some feel that people convicted of a crime who have been sentenced to probation, but not prison , and are living in the community should have the right to vote. Others feel that they should not have the right to vote. What about you? Do you think people on probation should have the right to vote?" [The term "but not prison" was bolded by ProCon.org to illustrate the difference between the Probation 1 and Probation 2 questions.]

Yes = 60%
C. Question - Parolee: "There has been some discussion recently about the right to vote in this country. Some feel that people convicted of a crime who are sentenced to probation, but not prison, and are living in the community should have the right to vote. Others feel that they should not have the right to vote. What about you? Do you think people on parole should have the right to vote?"

Yes = 60%
D. Question - Prisoner: "There has been some discussion recently about the right to vote in this country. Some feel that people convicted of a crime who are in prison, and are living in the community should have the right to vote. Others feel that they should not have the right to vote. What about you? Do you think people in prison should have the right to vote?"

Yes = 31%
Section II

A. Question - Baseline Ex-Felon: "Now how about people convicted of a crime who have served their entire sentence, and are now living in the community. Do you think they should have the right to vote?"

Yes = 80%
B. Question - White Collar Ex-Felon: "Now how about people convicted of the illegal trading of stocks, who have served their entire sentence, and are now living in the community. Do you think they should have the right to vote?"

Yes = 63%
C. Question - Violent Crime Ex-Felon: "Now how about people convicted of a violent crime, who have served their entire sentence, and are now living in the community. Do you think they should have the right to vote?"

Yes = 66%
D. Question - Sex Crime Ex-Felon: "Now how about people convicted of a sex offense, who have served their entire sentence, and are now living in the community. Do you think they should have the right to vote?"

Yes = 52%
 


2. Schroth and Associates Poll, Apr. 3-8, 2001
  • N = 600 Adult Floridians, MoE+/- = 4%
  • Conducted for the Collins Center for Public Policy and the James Madison Institute
  • Analyzed and reported on by Susan A. MacManus, PhD, Chair, Florida Elections Commission
  • Published in Journal of the James Madison Institute, Summer 2004
  • "Floridians Look Back At Election 2000 and Look Forward to Major Reforms" (PDF) 887KB
A. Percentages who support "restoring the voting rights of felons":

 

African American community 75%
Democrats 48%
18-34 year olds 47%
Non-Cuban Hispanics 46%
Those who did not vote in the presidential election last fall 45%
Persons undecided about whether they will vote in the 2002 Florida elections 57%
Republicans 17%