Last updated on: 8/5/2013 | Author: ProCon.org

Booker T. Stallworth Biography

Title:
Former Communications Director for the Washington State Senate Majority Coalition Caucus
Position:
Not Clearly Pro or Con to the question "Should Felons Who Have Completed Their Sentence (Incarceration, Probation, and Parole) Be Allowed to Vote?"
Reasoning:

“A felon who has not met all of [his/her] legal obligations has not paid his or her debt to society in full. So why should a felon’s voting rights be restored before that debt is paid?”

“ACLU’s Lawsuit for Felons’ Voting Rights Dishonors Crime Victims,” in Human Events, Apr. 7, 2006

[Editor’s Note: Individuals and organizations that do not support felon re-enfranchisement until felons have paid all fines and restitution (in addition to having completed their term of incarceration and probation/parole) are classified as Not Clearly Pro or Con. Also, those who support re-enfranchisement of some felons but not others (for example, felons who committed murder or rape) are also classified as Not Clearly Pro or Con.]

Theoretical Expertise Ranking:
  Organizations/VIPs/Others
Individuals and organizations that do not fit into the other star categories.
Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Former Communications Director, Washington State Senate Majority Coalition Caucus
  • Lecturer, Federalist Society, Jan. 2006-present
  • Deputy Communications Director, Washington State Senate, Aug. 2007-Dec. 2012
  • Communication Director, Evergreen Freedom Foundation, Mar. 2004-Aug. 2007
  • Senior Advisor, Mississippi Center for Public Policy
  • Contributor, Human Events Online
  • Editor, “Unlocking Washington’s Prison Capacity Shortfall,” a special report from the Evergreen Freedom Foundation
  • Former Editor, China Watch, a publication on human rights in China
  • Former Communication Director, Freedom Alliance
  • Former Director, Allegheny Institute’s School Choice Project
  • Member, Amnesty International
Education:
  • BA, Political Science and Communications Rhetoric, University of Pittsburgh
Other:
  • None found
Quoted in:
  1. Are Felon Disenfranchisement Laws a Form of Racial Discrimination?
  2. Should Felons Have to Pay All Fines, Fees, and Restitutions Related to Their Conviction before Regaining Their Vote?