Should Felons Who Have Completed Their Sentence (Incarceration, Probation, and Parole) Be Allowed to Vote?




An estimated 6.1 million people with a felony conviction are barred from voting in elections - a condition known as disenfranchisement. Each state has its own laws on disenfranchisement. While Vermont and Maine allow felons to vote while in prison, ten other states permanently restrict certain felons from voting.

Proponents of felon re-enfranchisement say that felons who have paid their debt to society by completing their sentences should have all of their rights and privileges restored. They argue that efforts to block ex-felons from voting are unfair, undemocratic, and politically or racially motivated.

Opponents say felon voting restrictions are consistent with other voting limitations such as age, residency, sanity, etc., and other felon restrictions such as no guns for violent offenders and no sex offenders near schools. They say that convicted felons have demonstrated poor judgment and should not be trusted with a vote.


 

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Last updated on 7/2/2019 11:07:50 AM PST

An estimated 6.1 million people with a felony conviction are barred from voting in elections - a condition known as disenfranchisement. Each state has its own laws on disenfranchisement. While Vermont and Maine allow felons to vote while in prison, ten other states permanently restrict certain felons from voting.

Proponents of felon re-enfranchisement say that felons who have paid their debt to society by completing their sentences should have all of their rights and privileges restored. They argue that efforts to block ex-felons from voting are unfair, undemocratic, and politically or racially motivated.

Opponents say felon voting restrictions are consistent with other voting limitations such as age, residency, sanity, etc., and other felon restrictions such as no guns for violent offenders and no sex offenders near schools. They say that convicted felons have demonstrated poor judgment and should not be trusted with a vote.

 

PROS & CONS BY CATEGORY
CORE QUESTION

Felon, Felony, & Disenfranchisement Defined

Felon Population Statistics

Elections & Politics

Race

US Constitution

Voting Rights Act

Federal & State Law

International Law

Philosophical Questions

Policy-Oriented Questions

Should the Death Penalty Be Allowed?

State Felon Voting Laws


Should More Gun Control Laws Be Enacted?











Notices for Felon Voting and Other ProCon.org Information (archived after 30 days) rss icon
NEW ProCon.org Website! - 2020 Presidential Election: The Candidates and Where They Stand on the Issues
8/29/2019 – Learn about the presidential candidates' views on important issues, compare them with a side-by-side chart, take our matching quiz, track their finances, and so much more on our 2020 Presidential Election website. The New York Times called our previous presidential election site "The most comprehensive tool for researching the candidate's stance on issues." Check back monthly for expanded issue coverage.

Archived Notices

Last updated on 7/2/2019 11:07:50 AM PST